Clarissa Dickson Wright’s roast pork

By Clarissa Dickson Wright

Shoulder is a reasonably priced cut of pork and, with the British Lop or heritage breeds in general, there will be enough fat to give you good crackling. You can, if you prefer, stuff a cut of the leg instead. You can vary the stuffing to suit your taste and store cupboard but make sure you include something like the lemon juice, rind and capers to lift the taste. If you want more stuffing you can make the surplus mixture into balls and cook them around the meat.

Taken from the Great British Food Revival book, which accompanies the current TV show.

Serves 6

For the meat

* 2kg boned shoulder of pork

For the stuffing

* 3 tbsp olive oil, plus extra for rubbing
* 1 onion, finely chopped
* 4 slices white bread, crusts removed, cut into 1cm dice
* 75g walnuts, chopped
* 2 tsp small capers
* Juice and zest of 1 lemon
* 5 fresh sage leaves, chopped
* Salt and pepper
* 1 large free range egg, to bind

1 Preheat the oven to 230°C/450°F/Gas 8. Heat the olive oil in a large frying pan over a medium heat and gently fry the onion until soft and translucent. Add the breadcrumbs and fry for a further 2–3 minutes. Remove from the heat.

2 Stir in the walnuts, capers, lemon juice and zest and sage leaves, and season. Allow to cool for 10 minutes. Then, break the egg into the pan and mix thoroughly to coat all the ingredients.

3 Lay the pork skin-side down and spread the stuffing over the meat. Roll it up and tie securely with string. Make scores 2cm apart in the skin using a sharp knife, and rub with salt and oil.

4 Set the pork on a roasting tray and place in the oven. After 25 minutes turn the heat down to 170°C/325°F /Gas 3. Roast for a further 1 hour and 20 minutes then test with a skewer. When cooked the pork juices run clear. Remove from the oven and cover with tin foil. Allow to rest for 10 minutes before slicing and serving with mashed potatoes and gravy.

To buy the Great British Food Revival cook book, click here.

To read about Northfield Farm’s appearance on Great British Food Revival, click here.

Clarissa Dickson Wright at Northfield Farm

Matt Wright
The author:

Matt lives in Leicestershire with his wife, two kids and dog. He is passionate about British pubs, slow food and home brewing. He founded Great Food Club (originally as Great Food Magazine) in 2010 after being inspired by local producers near his home town of Melton Mowbray - Britain's 'Rural Capital of Food'.