Coronation Chicken Pie recipe

Published on May 8, 2012

Coronation chicken is a dish that’s truly stood the test of time, writes Sean Hope. It was created for the Queen’s Coronation in 1953 by London’s Cordon Bleu School. What better time to revisit this dish than the Diamond Jubilee on June 5? This Coronation Chicken Pie – and more – will be on our menus at the Olive Branch in Clipsham and Red Lion in Stathern throughout June.

In terms of wine to go with the pie, Duncan Murray of Market Harborough-based Duncan Murray Wines has two suggestions.

Duncan Murray, The Olive Branch and The Red Lion of Stathern are all part of Great Food Club.

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BLOW IT!
Wine: Domaine ‘La Maison’ St Véran


Grape: Chardonnay
Duncan says: This classic white Burgundy offers a superbly regal wine accompaniment to this Jubilee dish. Produced from Chardonnay – one of the ‘noble’ grape varieties – its elegant yet intense citrus and mineral flavours will complement the creaminess of the filling without being overwhelmed by the spice and the buttery notes will be the perfect match for the pastry. A crown jewel of a wine.
Price: £14.99

BUDGET
Wine: Den Chenin Blanc


Grapes: Chenin Blanc
Duncan says: This white from South Africa will make you want to troop the colour as you sip it with your Coronation Chicken Pie. The ripe and concentrated flavours of apple, spice and stone fruit will work harmoniously with the spicy and creamy filling while the slightly toasty finish will provide a fitting fanfare for the pastry.
Price: £8.99

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Coronation Chicken Pie
Serves 6

For the pastry
* Pinch of salt
* 200g plain flour
* 25g suet
* 25g unsalted butter, diced
* 1½ tsp water

1 Place the flour, salt and fat into a bowl and mix with your hands to a breadcrumb texture.
2 Add the water and work to a dough.
3 Allow to rest for around 15 minutes before using.

Pie mix
* 1 chicken, roast at Gas 1/2 (120°C) for four hours and allowed to cool
* 200ml chicken stock
* 200ml double cream
* 200ml milk
* 1 glass dry white wine
* 1 glass medium sherry
* 1 tbsp ground cumin
* 1 tbsp ground turmeric
* 1 tbsp ground coriander
* 2 tbsp fresh coriander, chopped
* 2 tbsp sultanas pre-soaked in sherry vinegar
* 2 tbsp dry-roasted pine nuts
* 1 onion, peeled and chopped
* 1 garlic clove, peeled and chopped
* 2 tbsp cornflour

1 Carefully pick the chicken meat off the bone and place in a bowl.
2 Mix all the spices together, place in a pan and singe in a hot oven for five minutes to bake.
3 Mix the spices through the chicken.
4 In a saucepan, sweat the onion and garlic with a drizzle of rapeseed oil until soft. Add the pre-soaked sultanas and reduce vinegar completely.
6 Place the onion and sultana mix into the bowl with the chicken and stir. Add the roasted pine nuts and fresh, chopped coriander.
7 In a separate pan, add the stock, milk, cream and wine and bring to the boil. Boil for five minutes, then dilute the cornflour with one glass of medium sherry and whisk into the boiling stock.
8 Bring back to the boil, then season to taste. Remove from the heat and allow to cool before adding to the chicken mix.
9 Place the chicken pie mix into a suitable pie dish (28cm diameter).
10 Roll out the pastry with a rolling pin to about 5mm thick. Brush the sides of the pie dish with a little egg wash, then place some thin strips of pastry around the edge to form a collar.
11 Carefully lay the pastry over the pie dish. Trim off excess pastry from around the dish and crimp with a fork. Make a small hole in the middle of the pastry to allow excess steam to escape whilst cooking, then brush all over with egg wash.
13 Allow the pastry to rest for 10 minutes before baking in a pre-heated oven at Gas 6 (200°C) for around 35 minutes (until golden brown).
14 Remove from the oven and allow to stand for five minutes before serving.
15 Serve with minted new potatoes and glazed carrots.

Sean Hope

Matt Wright
The author:

Matt lives in Leicestershire with his wife, two kids and dog. He is passionate about British pubs, slow food and home brewing. He founded Great Food Club (originally as Great Food Magazine) in 2010 after being inspired by local producers near his home town of Melton Mowbray - Britain's 'Rural Capital of Food'.