Recipe: Italian lambs’ liver and onions

Published October 9, 2012

By Carmela Sereno Hayes

This meal is simplicity at its best. Liver is so inexpensive and was often made at home when I was growing up, offered to us as a deliciously smooth paté or slow cooked with a deep, rich, thickened sauce.

As the winter approaches our evening meals become warm, comforting and yet still relatively simple to prepare. I think my lambs’ liver and onions is always best served with mustard mash and plenty of fresh, seasonal vegetables.

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Serves 4

350g lambs’ liver
2 tbsp flour, seasoned with salt and pepper
Olive oil
25g butter
1 tbsp tomato puree
1 red onion, sliced
1 white onion, sliced
2 cloves of garlic, sliced
200ml red wine
500ml beef stock
Salt and pepper to season
5 sage leaves, sliced, and extra to garnish

1. Trim any fat or sinew from the liver. Toss the liver in seasoned flour and flash fry for 1 minute on each side. This will sear the meat and encase the flavour. Remove from the pan and set aside to rest while you prepare the sauce.

2. In the same pan now add a glug of olive oil and 25g of butter and fry off the sliced onions and garlic. Cook for 5 minutes, slowly until lightly caramelised. Squeeze in the tomato puree and stir.

3. Pour the red wine into the onions and reduce by half, cooking for about 7 minutes.

4. Now add inthe beef stock, stir and season with salt and pepper. If you like a little heat then add a pinch of chilli.

5. Place the liver back into the pan and sprinkle the fresh chopped sage over the top. Cook on a medium heat for around 10-15 minutes, until the sauce has thickened slightly.

This is an Italian twist to a delicious British dish. The liver becomes tender and develops and takes on the rich flavour of the sauce. Plate up with mustard mash and vegetables or serve on a bed of split peas. This will without fail warm your bones on a cold night.

For more of Carmela’s recipes, visit Carmela’s Kitchen

Carmela at home

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Matt Wright
The author:

Matt lives in Leicestershire with his wife, two kids and dog. He is passionate about British pubs, slow food and home brewing. He founded Great Food Club (originally as Great Food Magazine) in 2010 after being inspired by local producers near his home town of Melton Mowbray - Britain's 'Rural Capital of Food'.