Recipe: raspberry and frangipane tart

This recipe is from Edward Halls, head chef and owner of The Clock House in Upton near Southwell, Nottinghamshire.

Edward says: “This is an absolute winner; the frangipane tart at The Clock House is our most popular sweet treat by far; we serve it warm with a little clotted cream.”

To find out more about Edward and The Clock House, click here.

For the sweet pastry
125g butter
½ tsp salt
70g caster sugar
300g plain flour
1 egg
15g water

For the frangipane
225g ground almonds
225g icing sugar
225g soft unsalted butter
60g plain flour
½ tsp salt
4 whole eggs

250g fresh raspberries
Apricot jam to glaze

Method
For the sweet pastry, rub the butter, salt and sugar into the flour until it resembles breadcrumbs, add the beaten egg and water and bring together until it forms a dough. Then divide, wrap in cling film and refrigerate for at least 30 minutes.

Line a 23cm tart tin (one with a removable bottom is easiest) with sweet pastry; roll as thin as possible and ensure there are no cracks. Rest in the fridge for 15 minutes, then place a double layer of cling film in it and fill with uncooked rice. Place in the oven at 160C (Gas Mark 2) for 20-25 minutes, remove and carefully lift out the cling film and rice, holding the edges, then place back in the oven for 5 minutes until the pastry is fully cooked and golden.

Combine all frangipane ingredients together in a bowl and whisk until thoroughly combined. Stir in the raspberries, reserving a few to arrange on the top. Spoon all the mixture into the blind baked pastry case, smooth it until even and push the remaining raspberries into the surface.

Bake at 160C (Gas Mark 2) for 30-40 minutes until there is no wobble and it is deep golden in colour. At this point warm some smooth apricot jam in the microwave or in a pan and brush it all over to glaze. Trim the excess pastry from the sides with a knife and allow to cool for at least 20 minutes.

You will love every bite of this wonderful tart!

Matt Wright
The author:

Matt lives in Leicestershire with his wife, two kids and dog. He is passionate about British pubs, slow food and home brewing. He founded Great Food Club (originally as Great Food Magazine) in 2010 after being inspired by local producers near his home town of Melton Mowbray - Britain's 'Rural Capital of Food'.