Clementine Curd and Cinnamon Mess

Serves 6

This will make more curd than you need; keep the rest in the fridge (for up to a week) and spread on toast or muffins.

3-4 clementines (use firm ones)
1 tbsp lemon juice
200g caster sugar
120g unsalted butter, diced
2 large eggs, beaten

For the meringue:
2 egg whites
75g caster sugar
50g dark brown muscovado sugar
1 tsp ground cinnamon
400ml double cream
6 clementines

1. Zest the clementines to get 3 tbsp zest. Juice them to get 5 tbsp juice. Put the zest and juice in a heatproof bowl with the lemon juice, sugar and butter. Place over a pan of simmering water (don’t let the water touch the bowl) and whisk until the butter has melted and the sugar crystals have dissolved.

2. Add the eggs and whisk while heating, until the mixture thickens and coats the back of a wooden spoon. This may take a while. Don’t overheat or it will curdle. Remove the bowl from the heat and leave to cool, then chill in an airtight container until needed.

3. To make the meringue, whisk the egg whites to stiff peaks. Add 2 tbsp sugar with the cinnamon and whisk. Gradually add the remaining sugar, whisking until stiff and glossy.

4. Line a tray with baking parchment. Use a pallet knife to spread over the meringue to 2-3cm thick. Bake at 110°C (Gas Mark ½) for 2-2½ hours, depending on your oven.

5. Turn it off, open the door slightly and let the meringue cool slowly in the oven. Transfer to an airtight container until needed.

6. Whisk the cream to soft peaks. Chop the clementines into small pieces. Break the meringue into small pieces and mix in a bowl with the cream and clementines. Swirl through a few spoonfuls of the curd.

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Riverford is part of Great Food Club

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Matt Wright
The author:

Matt lives in Leicestershire with his wife, two kids and dog. He is passionate about British pubs, slow food and home brewing. He founded Great Food Club (originally as Great Food Magazine) in 2010 after being inspired by local producers near his home town of Melton Mowbray - Britain's 'Rural Capital of Food'.